• Mechanicsburg Office
    Fredricksen Outpatient Center
    2025 Technology Parkway, Suites 108 & 109
    Mechanicsburg, PA 17050
    Phone: (717) 791-2680
    Fax: (717) 791-2686
  • Camp Hill Office
    25 West Shore Drive
    Camp Hill, PA 17011
    Phone: (717) 791-2680
    Fax: (717) 909-6803
HealthCenter
JDC is currently accepting newborns into the practice. However, so that we can continue to offer our existing patients the care and attention that they deserve, JDC is no longer accepting families with existing children who wish to transfer their care from another practice. This will remain in effect until further notice.
Text4baby is a free* health information service delivered on your mobile phone, to help keep you and your baby healthy. JDC Pediatrics recommends this app, which will give you access to well-visit information, a personalized vaccination tracker, and appointment reminders. Click here for sign-up info.
Does your child always seem to have some kind of form or another to be completed? He may or may not need to be seen, depending on the type of form. Click here to find out what you will need to do.
The flu vaccine for the 2017-18 flu season is now available at JDC Pediatrics. We recommend that all children ages 6 months through 18 years receive this vaccine. Please call our office to schedule an appointment. Click here for more info on the flu vaccine.
The American Accademy of Pediatrics (AAP) is advising parents to stop giving fruit juice to children in the first year of life, saying the drink is not as healthful as many parents think. Click here for more info and age-group recommendations for fruit juice.
Previously the HPV vaccine was given as a 3-dose series for all eligible-aged children. Now only 2 doses are recommended for children age 9 through 14, with the doses separated by at least 6 months. Children who begin HPV vaccination at 15 years of age and older will still need 3 doses. We will send a reminder call to you when your child is due for their next dose.

Is Your Child Sick? TM


Toenail - Ingrown

Is this your child's symptom?

  • The corner of the toenail grows into the skin around it
  • Almost always involves the big toe (great toe)

Symptoms of an Ingrown Toenail

  • Toe pain from sharp corner of toenail cutting into surrounding skin.
  • Redness and swelling around the corner of the toenail is usually present.
  • The area may drain pus or yellow fluid.
  • The red area is very tender to touch or pressure from a shoe.
  • Some teens with an ingrown toenail can barely walk.

Cause of an Ingrown Toenail

  • The toenail is usually pushed into the skin by wearing tight shoes.
  • The tiny cut made by the nail allows bacteria to enter the skin. The cut then becomes infected.
  • The sharp corner of buried nail keeps growing. The deeper it goes, the more painful it becomes.

When to Call for Toenail - Ingrown

Call 911 Now

  • You think your child has a life-threatening emergency

Call Doctor Now or Go to ER

  • Spreading red area or streak with fever
  • Spreading red area or streak that's very large
  • Severe pain not improved 2 hours after pain medicine and antibiotic ointment
  • Your child looks or acts very sick
  • You think your child needs to be seen, and the problem is urgent

Call Doctor Within 24 Hours

  • Spreading red area or streak without fever
  • Entire toe is red and swollen
  • Pus pocket (yellow or green) seen in skin around toenail or under toenail. (Reason: needs to be drained).
  • You think your child needs to be seen, but the problem is not urgent

Call Doctor During Office Hours

  • Can't locate and free up corner of toenail
  • After using Care Advice more than 2 days, pus discharge not gone
  • After using Care Advice more than 3 days, still hard to walk
  • After using Care Advice more than 7 days, not improved
  • After using Care Advice more than 14 days, not gone
  • Ingrown toenails are a frequent problem
  • You have other questions or concerns

Self Care at Home

  • Minor ingrown toenail

Call 911 Now

  • You think your child has a life-threatening emergency

Call Doctor Now or Go to ER

  • Spreading red area or streak with fever
  • Spreading red area or streak that's very large
  • Severe pain not improved 2 hours after pain medicine and antibiotic ointment
  • Your child looks or acts very sick
  • You think your child needs to be seen, and the problem is urgent

Call Doctor Within 24 Hours

  • Spreading red area or streak without fever
  • Entire toe is red and swollen
  • Pus pocket (yellow or green) seen in skin around toenail or under toenail. (Reason: needs to be drained).
  • You think your child needs to be seen, but the problem is not urgent

Call Doctor During Office Hours

  • Can't locate and free up corner of toenail
  • After using Care Advice more than 2 days, pus discharge not gone
  • After using Care Advice more than 3 days, still hard to walk
  • After using Care Advice more than 7 days, not improved
  • After using Care Advice more than 14 days, not gone
  • Ingrown toenails are a frequent problem
  • You have other questions or concerns

Self Care at Home

  • Minor ingrown toenail

Care Advice for Ingrown Toenail

  1. What You Should Know About Ingrown Toenails:
    • Ingrown toenails are always painful.
    • Pain is caused by the sharp toenail edge cutting into the skin around it.
    • The pain can be stopped. Find the toenail corner and lift it out of the raw tissue.
    • This will allow the area to heal.
    • Most ingrown toenails can be treated at home. Surgery or nail removal is rarely needed.
    • Here is some care advice that should help.
  2. Warm Soaks:
    • Soak the toe in warm water and soap for 20 minutes twice a day.
    • While soaking, massage the swollen part of the cuticle (skin next to the nail). Massage away from the nail.
    • While soaking, also try to bend the corners of the toenail upward.
    • Dry the toe and foot completely.
  3. Elevate Corner of Toenail with Dental Floss:
    • Goal: To help the toenail corner grow over the cuticle, rather than into it.
    • Take a short strip of dental floss or fishing line. Try to slip it under the corner of the nail. Then, lift the nail upward. Cut off any sharp edge.
    • Take a small wedge of cotton from a cotton ball. Try to place the wedge under the nail corner to keep it elevated. (Sometimes this step is impossible).
    • Elevate the corner away from the cuticle with every soak.
  4. Antibiotic Ointment:
    • After each soak, use an antibiotic ointment (such as Polysporin). Put it on the swollen part of the toe.
    • You can buy this ointment without a prescription.
  5. Taking Pressure Off Toenail With a Cotton Ball:
    • Until it heals, try to wear sandals or go barefoot.
    • When your child must wear closed shoes protect the ingrown toenail as follows:
    • Inner Edge of Toe. If the inner edge of the big toe is involved, try this technique. Tape a cotton ball or foam pad between the lower part of the first and second toes. This will keep the upper toes from touching.
    • Outer Edge of Toe. If the outer edge is involved, use a cotton ball. Tape it to the outside of the lower toe.
    • This will keep the toenail from touching the side of the shoe.
    • Never wear tight, narrow, or pointed shoes.
  6. Pain Medicine:
    • To help with the pain, give an acetaminophen product (such as Tylenol).
    • Another choice is an ibuprofen product (such as Advil).
    • Use as needed.
  7. Prevention - Nail Trimming:
    • Cut your child's toenails straight across so you can see the corners. Use a nail clipper.
    • Do not round off corners. Keep the corners visible.
    • Do not cut them too short.
    • After baths or showers, the nails are soft. Bend the corners of the toenails upward.
  8. Prevention - Wear Shoes That Fit:
    • Make sure that your child's shoes are not too narrow. Give away any pointed or tight shoes.
    • Tight narrow shoes are the most common cause of ingrown toenails.
    • Shoes should have a wide toe box. The toes should not feel cramped.
  9. What to Expect:
    • With treatment, the pus should be gone in 48 hours.
    • Pain should be gone in 1 week.
    • Area should be healed up in 2 weeks.
  10. Call Your Doctor If:
    • Spreading redness or fever occur
    • Pus pocket occurs
    • Not improved after 7 days
    • You think your child needs to be seen
    • Your child becomes worse

And remember, contact your doctor if your child develops any of the 'Call Your Doctor' symptoms.

Disclaimer: This information is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice. It is provided for educational purposes only. You assume full responsibility for how you choose to use this information.


Copyright 1994-2017 Schmitt Pediatric Guidelines LLC. All rights reserved.


Mechanicsburg Office • 2025 Technology Parkway, Suites 108 & 109 • (717) 791-2680 | Camp Hill Office • 25 West Shore Drive • (717) 791-2680