• Mechanicsburg Office
    Fredricksen Outpatient Center
    2025 Technology Parkway, Suites 108 & 109
    Mechanicsburg, PA 17050
    Phone: (717) 791-2680
    Fax: (717) 791-2686
  • Camp Hill Office
    25 West Shore Drive
    Camp Hill, PA 17011
    Phone: (717) 791-2680
    Fax: (717) 909-6803
HealthCenter
JDC is currently accepting newborns into the practice. However, so that we can continue to offer our existing patients the care and attention that they deserve, JDC is no longer accepting families with existing children who wish to transfer their care from another practice. This will remain in effect until further notice.
Text4baby is a free* health information service delivered on your mobile phone, to help keep you and your baby healthy. JDC Pediatrics recommends this app, which will give you access to well-visit information, a personalized vaccination tracker, and appointment reminders. Click here for sign-up info.
Does your child always seem to have some kind of form or another to be completed? He may or may not need to be seen, depending on the type of form. Click here to find out what you will need to do.
The flu vaccine for the 2017-18 flu season is now available at JDC Pediatrics. We recommend that all children ages 6 months through 18 years receive this vaccine. Please call our office to schedule an appointment. Click here for more info on the flu vaccine.
The American Accademy of Pediatrics (AAP) is advising parents to stop giving fruit juice to children in the first year of life, saying the drink is not as healthful as many parents think. Click here for more info and age-group recommendations for fruit juice.
Previously the HPV vaccine was given as a 3-dose series for all eligible-aged children. Now only 2 doses are recommended for children age 9 through 14, with the doses separated by at least 6 months. Children who begin HPV vaccination at 15 years of age and older will still need 3 doses. We will send a reminder call to you when your child is due for their next dose.

Is Your Child Sick? TM


Acne

Is this your child's symptom?

  • Acne is a skin condition caused by blocked oil glands
  • Main symptoms are pimples and blackheads on the face

Symptoms of Acne

  • Whiteheads (pimples) are plugged oil glands that are closed.
  • Blackheads are plugged oil glands that are open. Reason: The oil turns black when it is exposed to air.
  • Whiteheads and blackheads are also called "zits."
  • Red bumps are from blocked oil glands that have leaked oil. This causes irritation in the skin around them. Larger red bumps can be quite painful.
  • Acne mainly appears on your face, neck, and shoulders

Causes of Acne

  • Acne skin changes are from plugged oil glands. Acne has several causes.
  • Increased levels of hormones during puberty have a part. Heredity also plays an important role.
  • Some skin bacteria can make it worse.
  • Acne is not caused by diet. You do not need to avoid eating fried foods, chocolate, or any other food.
  • Acne is not caused by dirt or by not washing your face often enough.

When to Call for Acne

Call Doctor Now or Go to ER

  • Spreading red area around the acne with fever
  • Spreading red area or streak that's very large
  • Your child looks or acts very sick

Call Doctor Within 24 Hours

  • Spreading red area or streak around the acne, but no fever
  • You think your child needs to be seen

Call Doctor During Office Hours

  • Tender red lumps that are large occur
  • Yellow soft scab that drains pus or gets bigger occurs
  • After treating with Benzoyl Peroxide (BP) for 2 months, acne not improved
  • BP makes the face itchy or swollen
  • You have other questions or concerns

Self Care at Home

  • Mild acne

Call Doctor Now or Go to ER

  • Spreading red area around the acne with fever
  • Spreading red area or streak that's very large
  • Your child looks or acts very sick

Call Doctor Within 24 Hours

  • Spreading red area or streak around the acne, but no fever
  • You think your child needs to be seen

Call Doctor During Office Hours

  • Tender red lumps that are large occur
  • Yellow soft scab that drains pus or gets bigger occurs
  • After treating with Benzoyl Peroxide (BP) for 2 months, acne not improved
  • BP makes the face itchy or swollen
  • You have other questions or concerns

Self Care at Home

  • Mild acne

Care Advice for Acne

  1. What You Should Know About Acne:
    • More than 90% of teenagers have some acne. Acne is a normal part of the teen years.
    • There is no medicine at this time that will cure acne.
    • However, good skin care can keep acne under control and at a mild level.
    • Here is some care advice that should help.
  2. Benzoyl Peroxide Gel:
    • Benzoyl Peroxide (BP) is the best OTC medicine for bringing acne under control. Use a Benzoyl Peroxide 5% gel product (such as the store brand). OTC means no prescription is needed.
    • It helps to open pimples and to unplug blackheads. It also kills bacteria.
    • Apply the lotion once a day at bedtime to the area with acne. Redheads and blonds should apply it every other day for the first 2 weeks. Reason: More sensitive skin.
    • Use an amount of lotion the size of a pea. This should be enough to cover most of the acne.
    • If the skin becomes red or peels, use less of it. Other option: You can use it less often.
    • Caution: Avoid the corners of the eyes, nose and mouth. Reason: These areas are very sensitive.
    • Caution: Benzoyl Peroxide bleaches clothing, towels, blankets, etc. Apply it only at bedtime and put it on sparingly. Use a plain white pillowcase.
  3. Antibiotics for Red Bumps:
    • Large red bumps mean the infection has spread beyond the oil gland. If you have several red bumps, your doctor may prescribe an antibiotic.
    • Antibiotics come as solutions for the skin or as pills.
    • The antibiotic will kill the bacteria that are causing the infection.
    • Give the antibiotic as directed.
  4. Washing the Face:
    • Wash your skin twice a day. The most important time to wash is bedtime. Just use warm water or you can use a mild soap (such as Dove).
    • Shampoo your hair daily.
    • Avoid scrubbing your skin. Reason: Hard scrubbing of the skin irritates the openings of the oil glands. This causes them to close off even more tightly.
  5. Pimple Opening:
    • Opening (popping) pimples is not advised by many doctors. But, most teens and adults do it anyway.
    • So, here's how to open a pimple safely without any squeezing.
    • Never open a pimple before it has come to a head.
    • Wash your face and hands first.
    • Use a sterile needle (cleaned with rubbing alcohol). Nick the surface of the yellow pimple with the tip of the needle. The pus should run out without squeezing.
    • Wipe away the pus and wash the area with soap and water.
    • Opening small pimples in this way will not cause skin damage.
  6. Avoid Picking or Squeezing Acne:
    • Many young people pick at their acne when they are not thinking about it. Picking makes acne worse.
    • Try not to touch the face at all during the day.
    • Squeezing blackheads causes bleeding into the skin. The bleeding turns into brownish blotches on the skin. They can take 1 or 2 months to fade.
    • Squeezing red lumps can force bacteria into the skin. This too leaves blotches. It can also cause a serious face infection.
  7. Prevention - Avoid Triggers of Acne:
    • Avoid putting any oily or greasy substances on your face. Reason: They block oil glands and make acne worse. If you use cosmetics, use water-based cosmetics.
    • Avoid hair tonics or hair creams (especially greasy ones). When you sweat, they will get on the face and irritate the acne.
  8. What to Expect:
    • With treatment, new whiteheads and blackheads will decrease. But, it takes 6 to 8 weeks.
    • Acne usually lasts until age 20 or 25.
    • So, you will need to continue the treatment for several years.
    • You don't need to worry about scarring. It is very rare for acne to leave any scars.
  9. Call Your Doctor If:
    • With treatment, the acne has not improved after 2 months
    • It looks infected (large, red, tender bumps)
    • You think your child needs to be seen
    • Your child becomes worse

And remember, contact your doctor if your child develops any of the 'Call Your Doctor' symptoms.

Disclaimer: This information is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice. It is provided for educational purposes only. You assume full responsibility for how you choose to use this information.


Copyright 1994-2017 Schmitt Pediatric Guidelines LLC. All rights reserved.


Mechanicsburg Office • 2025 Technology Parkway, Suites 108 & 109 • (717) 791-2680 | Camp Hill Office • 25 West Shore Drive • (717) 791-2680