• Mechanicsburg Office
    Fredricksen Outpatient Center
    2025 Technology Parkway, Suites 108 & 109
    Mechanicsburg, PA 17050
    Phone: (717) 791-2680
    Fax: (717) 791-2686
  • Camp Hill Office
    25 West Shore Drive
    Camp Hill, PA 17011
    Phone: (717) 791-2680
    Fax: (717) 909-6803
HealthCenter
JDC is currently accepting newborns into the practice. However, so that we can continue to offer our existing patients the care and attention that they deserve, JDC is no longer accepting families with existing children who wish to transfer their care from another practice. This will remain in effect until further notice.
Text4baby is a free* health information service delivered on your mobile phone, to help keep you and your baby healthy. JDC Pediatrics recommends this app, which will give you access to well-visit information, a personalized vaccination tracker, and appointment reminders. Click here for sign-up info.
Does your child always seem to have some kind of form or another to be completed? He may or may not need to be seen, depending on the type of form. Click here to find out what you will need to do.
The flu vaccine for the 2017-18 flu season is now available at JDC Pediatrics. We recommend that all children ages 6 months through 18 years receive this vaccine. Please call our office to schedule an appointment. Click here for more info on the flu vaccine.
The American Accademy of Pediatrics (AAP) is advising parents to stop giving fruit juice to children in the first year of life, saying the drink is not as healthful as many parents think. Click here for more info and age-group recommendations for fruit juice.
Previously the HPV vaccine was given as a 3-dose series for all eligible-aged children. Now only 2 doses are recommended for children age 9 through 14, with the doses separated by at least 6 months. Children who begin HPV vaccination at 15 years of age and older will still need 3 doses. We will send a reminder call to you when your child is due for their next dose.

Child Behavior

Disrespect

"My child is often disrespectful to me. She talks back in a sassy manner, yells at me, and sometimes calls me names. The more I punish her, the worse it gets."

Understanding Your Child, Yourself, and the Situation

Children learn from the examples they see. Too many parents expect their children to be respectful when they are not respectful to their children. Punishment is not respectful.

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Suggestions

1. In a calm, respectful voice, tell your child, "If I have ever spoken to you that way, I apologize. I don't want to hurt you or be hurt by you. Can we start over?"

2. "You are obviously very upset right now. I know it upsets me when you talk that way. Let's both take some time out to calm down. We can talk later when we feel better."

3. Another possibility is to say what you will do. "When you talk disrespectfully to me, I will leave the room. I love you and want to listen to you when you are ready to talk respectfully. I love myself enough to walk away from verbal abuse." Calmly leave the room without saying a word. If your child follows, go for a walk or get into the shower. After a cooling-off period, ask, "Are you ready to talk with me now?" If you are not too upset, try hugging your child. Sometimes children are not ready to accept a hug at this time. Other times a hug changes the atmosphere for both of you to one of love and respect.

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Planning Ahead to Prevent Future Problems

1. Be willing to take a look at how you might be teaching the very thing you abhor in your child by being disrespectful to her. Many parents have been shocked when they overheard their children talking to their dolls because their children were very good at mimicking how they were talked to.

2. If this is a recurring problem, put it on the family meeting agenda for discussion. Sometimes a discussion is enough to help the individuals involved cooperate to stop the problem.

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Life Skills Children Can Learn

Children can learn that it is not okay for them to be disrespectful to others or to tolerate others being disrespectful to them.

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Parenting Pointers

This is a good time to act instead of react. It is very tempting to get revenge by punishing when your children hurt your feelings. This models disrespect while trying to teach respect.

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Booster Thoughts

From a note sent by a grateful parent: "I'm all choked up right now because my fifteen-year-old daughter just came in and said, 'Mom, are you planning to do some washing today so that I can include my jeans, or should I put a load in before school?' It was such a respectful departure from 'Mom, have my jeans washed when I get home from school!'

Thank God for family meetings and calm dialogue instead of yelling, reacting, and the angry feelings we have known."

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These articles are an excerpt from the book Positive Discipline A-Z by Jane Nelsen, Lynn Lott and H. Stephen Glenn. If you are interested in learning more about the book or authors, please visit

www.positivediscipline.com.


Mechanicsburg Office • 2025 Technology Parkway, Suites 108 & 109 • (717) 791-2680 | Camp Hill Office • 25 West Shore Drive • (717) 791-2680